Seminars

Here are some of the more popular questions I am asked about my seminars, as well as my answers:

Who chooses the seminar topic?

Sometimes I am given the option of choosing the topic, but 95% of the time the seminar host chooses the topic.

Can you give me some examples of topics chosen in the past?

Yes. Here is a shortlist:

SEMINARS

• Arrest and Control: The basics for Security Personnel

• Arrest and Control: The basics for police/deputies/agents

• Arrest and Control: Getting a non-compliant suspect’s hands behind his back

• Arrest and Control: Controlling non-compliant suspects on the ground

• Arrest and Control: How to do your job and look good on camera

• Arrest and Control: Realism in training with no injuries

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu over 40: The 80/20 Rule, becoming a more efficient practitioner

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu over 40: How to reduce injuries without compromising realism

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu over 50: The Foundation

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu over 50: The One Thing (A simplified way of training)

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu over 50: Spar with Grandpa on Valium 

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Finishing and setting up straight arm locks

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Finishing and setting up the Kimura

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Finishing and setting up the Americana

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Finishing and setting up chokes

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Finishing and setting up leg locks

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Escapes from straight arm locks

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Escapes from bent arm locks

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Escapes from chokes

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Escapes from leg locks

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Pressure from the top positions

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Pressure from the guard

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Drills and combinations

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Blue belt preparation

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Purple belt preparation

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: Blue belt preparation

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: How to incorporate wrist locks with minimal risk of injury

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: How to incorporate finger locks with minimal risk of injury

• Cloth fighting for doormen and security personnel

• Controlling and escorting intoxicated individuals (for doormen and security personnel)

• Combatives: Edged Weapon Defenses

• Combatives: Edged Weapon Offenses

• Combatives: Empty Hand

• Filipino Kali: Single stick fighting

• Filipino Kali: Double stick fighting

• Filipino Kali: Single knife fighting

• Filipino Kali: Double knife fighting

• Filipino Kali: Empty hand fighting

• Filipino Kali: Low line kicking methods

• Jeet Kune Do: How to intercept punches

• Jeet Kune Do: How to intercept kicks

• Jeet Kune Do: How to intercept arm locks

• Jeet Kune Do: Basics, guiding concepts, ranges, tools, attribute development

• Jeet Kune Do: Functional trapping

• Jeet Kune Do: Low line warfare

• Jeet Kune Do: Environmental training (e.g. boxing/jiu jitsu/wrestling on a stairwell, fighting in a restroom)

• Kalis Ilustrisimo: Basic concepts, offenses and defenses of Ilustrisimo sword work

• Self-defense: For women only

• Self-defense: For pilots and flight crew only

• Self-defense: For police officers only

• Self-defense: For everyone (e.g. small women, big men, physically challenged individuals, etc.)

• Self-defense: Awareness workshop at a local mall (e.g. to prevent violence, see surveillance, be invisible, etc.)

 

INSTRUCTOR COURSES

• Affiliate Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Level One

• Affiliate Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Level Two

• Apprentice Grappling

• Arrest and Control, Level One for police only

• Arrest and Control, Level Two for police only

• Associate Grappling 

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu over 40: Level One

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu over 40: Level Two

• Brazilian Jiu Jitsu over 40: Level Three

• Filipino Kali: Level One

• Filipino Kali: Level Two

• Filipino Kali: Level Three

• Ground Control Tactics for police only

• Jeet Kune Do: Level One

• Jeet Kune Do: Level Two

• Jeet Kune Do: Level Three

• Jeet Kune Do: Level Four

• Jeet Kune Do: Level Five

KEEP IN MIND: This is just a shortlist of topics I have taught at seminars and workshops since 1987.

 

Who chooses the length of the seminar?

The seminar host chooses the length.

I recommend seminars be two to three hours in length, each day (whether they are one day, two-day, three-day and five-day seminars). I write this because it has been my experience that most students lose their ability to focus and retain information after two and a half hours of learning and training. On a handful of occasions, I have taught seminars for four, five and even six hours in one day. The majority of these students complained of being physically and mentally exhausted at the end of these long days. Plus, their ability to remember what was taught was minimal. So, two to three hours of training per day is optimum for most students.

Now, some instructors have been creative with the use of time. For example, some have had me teach a morning session for 90 minutes. Then, all of us took a two-hour break for lunch before returning to the afternoon training session. And while this kind of seminar training consumed a bit more time for me and those attending the seminar, the attendees didn’t feel as exhausted. Plus, they remembered more information.

How do you teach your seminars?

When I teach a seminar, I make the effort to meet the needs of the seminar host as well as the students in attendance. 

While every seminar is a bit different, here is a generic way in which I teach a seminar:

1. I introduce myself and the topic.

2. I explain and demonstrate the concepts and techniques that were chosen for the seminar. And when I finish this first round of instruction, I ask students if they have any questions.

3. Next, I allow students to practice the technique or drill for eight to ten minutes. During that time, I go around the room and assist students who are having difficulty and/or answer questions. 

4. I make sure that everything I teach is related to each other. For example, I may begin by teaching students how to properly establish base and posture inside of someone’s guard. Next, I’ll teach them the two most efficient ways to pass the guard. Next, I’ll teach them how to effectively and efficiently hold an opponent down from the 100 kilos position. Next, I will teach them the two or three of the highest percentage submissions from the 100 kilos position. Finally, I will make a review and have the student put everything together into a level one combination (NOTE: There are twelve levels of combination training!). I will also introduce them to a few new training methods – so they begin to focus on developing usable, repeatable and measurable skill sets rather than just the learning and memorizing of techniques.

5. I end the seminar by asking students two questions:

– Do you have any questions about anything we went over today?

– Do you have any questions about anything related to martial arts training (e.g. arm locks, leg locks, wrist locks, self-defense, multiple assailants, edged weapons, how to develop skill sets, etc.)?

I do this to make sure students understand and remember most of what was taught to them. I also do it to make sure everyone has the chance to learn something of great value to them. For example, I have had black belts attend my seminars and learn a few important details during the instructional portion of the seminar. And then when they were given the chance to ask questions at the end of the seminar, many of them told me they found great value in my answers. Some even said, “Your answers blew me away. I have asked that question to several other black belts and received ‘generic’ answers. When I heard your answer to my question, I knew you were teaching from your heart! When you return, I will definitely attend your seminar again!”

How does a person arrange a seminar with you?

Here are the details:

Send me an email with your ideas for hosting a seminar. Tell me your ideas and goals for the seminar. (NOTE: I am so much more than just an instructor who teaches “techniques!” I am a talented instructor who can help you and your students reach new heights in your martial training more efficiently, with more fun and fewer injuries!) In our emails, we will discuss dates, times, location, seminar costs, responsibilities and other important details.

2. If we reach an agreement, then I will ask you to send me a $400 non-refundable deposit. This can be done by cashiers check, personal or through Stripe or Venmo.

3. Once the deposit has been received, I will then put you on my schedule.

4. Next, either you or I will begin the search for airfare. One of us will purchase the ticket. My only requirement if you purchase the ticket is you must get me a “confirmed aisle seat” at the time of purchase. In other words, no waiting until check-in to choose seats – because all of the aisle seats will be gone by then.

5. Once I arrive in your city/country, I expect the following from you:

• You or one of your students will pick me up at the airport and take me to the hotel.

• You or one of your students will pick me up at the hotel and bring me to the seminar location.

• You or one of your students will make sure I am fed.

• You or one of your students will take me back to the airport.

Having taught 700+ seminars in 25 countries and on four continents, I have learned a lot about presenting to large groups of people. I understand my role for being there and will do everything in my power to make sure the training experience is positive for you and all who attend the seminar! 

If you’re interested in hosting me for a seminar, email me here and let’s talk.

I look forward to coming to your facility to teach you and your students from my heart! 

Thank you for your time,

Roy Harris